“ Number of private bank and wealth manager clients climbs 5% in the past year ”

- 2016 Top Private Banks & Wealth Managers survey

“ Increasing demand by clients to move investments offshore ”

- 2016 Top Private Banks & Wealth Managers survey

“ Only 4% of SA's fresh fruit is exported to Africa ”

- 2014 NDP Report

“ NDP aims to ensure an African language is taught in every school by 2019 from 10% currently ”

- 2014 NDP Report

“ NDP aims to improve life expectancy from 61.3 years to 70 years by 2030 ”

- NDP Report 2014

“ 28% of stockbroking clients trade ETFs, up from 18% in 2013 ”

- 2015 Top Stockbrokers Survey

“ 14% of stockbroking clients trade CFDs, down from 21% in 2013 ”

- 2015 Top Stockbrokers Survey

“ 90% of stockbroker clients are long-only equities traders ”

- 2015 Top Stockbrokers Survey

“ NDP target: 90% of households to have minimum sanitation standards by 2019 from 84% now ”

- 2014 NDP Report

“ Total revenue for wealth firms and private banks grew by an average of 22% in the past year ”

- 2016 Top Private Banks & Wealth Managers survey

“ Asset managers applying pressure to justify costs of research ”

- 2016 Ranking the Analysts survey

“ Regulators want asset managers to justify costs to end clients ”

- 2016 Ranking the Analysts survey

“ NDP goal: by 2019, 75% of pupils in grades 3, 6 and 9 should score at least 50% in literacy, maths and science ”

- 2014 NDP Report

“ 83% of clients rate their stockbroker ‘good’ or ‘excellent’ ”

- 2015 Top Stockbrokers Survey

“ 60% of stockbroker clients execute only one to three trades a month and 6% do more than 12 ”

- 2015 Top Stockbrokers Survey

“ Separating research and execution costs proving difficult ”

- 2016 Ranking the Analysts survey

“ Analyst time still skewed towards those firms that pay a lot for dealing ”

- 2016 Ranking the Analysts survey

“ Private banks and wealth managers manage assets worth close to R700bn ”

- 2016 Top Private Banks & Wealth Managers survey

“ The total value generated from BEE deals by the top 100 JSE-listed companies in the 20 years to end-2014 is R317bn ”

- The value of BEE deals

“ Staff schemes have gained R52bn in BEE deals by the top 100 JSE-listed companies over 20 years ”

- The value of BEE deals

“ Strategic investors have gained R196bn in BEE deals by the top 100 JSE-listed companies over 20 years ”

- The value of BEE deals

“ Community schemes have gained R69bn in BEE deals by the top 100 JSE-listed companies over 20 years ”

- The value of BEE deals

“ Mining has been the biggest creator of value in both absolute and relative terms in total BEE deals by the top 100 JSE-listed companies ”

- The value of BEE deals

“ Website security and platform efficiency are the most important factors to stockbroker clients ”

- 2015 Top Stockbrokers Survey
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Latest News

Private Banks & Wealth Managers survey

The judging process is finalised and the winners will be announced on 27 June at an awards ceremony at the Crowne Plaza Rosebank Hotel.

Intellidex’s Top Private Banks & Wealth Managers survey for 2017 closed with a record number of 5,977 clients ranking their service providers in the online survey. This compares with 2,700 clients last year. The results and full report will be published in the Financial Mail Investors Monthly magazine – our new media partner for this project – on 29 June.

The survey examines various aspects of clients’ experiences with their private banks and wealth managers. It provides a wealth of information on evolving client expectations and trends in the industry. The data provide valuable insights onto the wealth market, giving us an opportunity to shed light on many strategic questions the firms ask themselves.

For more on the Top Private Banks & Wealth Managers survey click here

SBG holds top spot among firms in analyst rankings

SBG Securities takes the top place in this year’s Financial Mail-Intellidex Top Analyst rankings for the second year in a row. The locally-based firm, part of the Standard Bank Group, has maintained its lead over international majors. RMB Morgan Stanley, the joint venture between Rand Merchant Bank and US firm Morgan Stanley, maintains its second-placed spot.

Awards were handed out a luncheon held at Times Media’s spanking new building in Empire Road on May 24, with comedian Nik Rabinowitz keeping the crowd highly entertained. The full report was published in that week’s Financial Mail and can found here.

Avior’s Richard Tessendorf and Kevin Mattison took top spot in the media category, which has become important as Naspers has grown into the biggest company on the JSE. Other important sectors including banks and retailers have stayed consistent with last year, with UBS’s Stephan Potgieter top-ranked in banks and Deutsche Bank’s Sean Holmes maintaining his top spot in general retailers. In total, of the 41 research categories, 25 had new top-ranked analysts.

And pointing to a promising future for SA’s, there were strong entries in the Young Analyst of the Year competition that is open to analysts under 30. Peregrine Securities’ Emlyn Flint won the award in the non-equities category and BPI Capital’s Lara Simpson was the best young equities analyst.

The FM rankings are the premier measure of the performance of institutional stockbrokers in providing research and other services to their clients.

Click here for more on Ranking the Analyst

Time for CEOs to find their voice

The recall of the finance minister on Monday last week in the middle of a crucial international roadshow, and then the subsequent cabinet reshuffle announced early on Friday morning, triggered an unprecedented response from organised business. Business Leadership South Africa put out a statement describing Gordhan’s recall as “ill advised” on the same day it happened. Three days later, last Thursday, BLSA was even more strident, questioning whether the president was really putting the constitution first. Using words unprecedented for organised business it said, “The membership of BLSA urgently calls on the President to demonstrate that he acts in the national interest. His powers are not without responsibility.” And then when the cabinet reshuffle was announced on Friday, the wording was even more strident: “We strongly condemn the action. It is irrational, ill-timed and completely disregards the national interest.”

Other organisations were similarly strident. The Banking Association declared, “The actions of the President have put our country into turmoil, at a time the country is trying to come together to address the problems we face. We have no choice but to say this reshuffle is not in the best interests of the country. We are also left with little choice but to question the motives behind this action.”

The CEO intiative, which was set up to partner with Treasury and organised labour early last year to defend the credit rating, was similarly strident: “The CEO Initiative is gravely concerned and disappointed by the ill-timed and irrational dismissal of a trusted and well-respected Minister of Finance and Deputy Finance Minister. This decision, and the manner in which it was taken, is likely to cause severe damage to an economy that is in dire need of growth and jobs.” 

But just what should CEOs be saying publicly where their brands are exposed?

Speaking through organised business structures takes the attention off individual brands. This can be a “safe space” for business leaders to speak out because the words aren’t directly related to their businesses. In making political statements, the risk is always that it will affect your brand or else it could lead to conflict with politicians that would damage business done with government. We have examples of this from the past. In 2007, FirstRand prepared a major campaign to get the public to write to then-president Thabo Mbeki to do something about crime. It was cancelled at the last minute after politicians intervened with management to warn that it would damage the group’s relationship with government.

The stakes now, however, appear much higher. We still don’t know why president Zuma dismissed the finance minister and his deputy, but we do know that they were top performers, doing a valiant job on behalf of the country and economy. There is every reason to think their dismissal was motivated by illegitimate ambitions.

So far, however, few business leaders have spoken up on behalf of their companies. Standard Bank joint CEOs Sim Tshabalala and Ben Kruger published a statement praising minister Pravin Gordhan and deputy Mcebisi Jonas, saying they “deeply regret the President’s decision to relieve them of their offices. We do not dispute the absolute prerogative of the President to appoint and dismiss Ministers as he sees fit but, on the publicly available information, we do not believe this was a well-considered or constructive decision.”

More forceful comments have been made by business leaders speaking through organised business. AngloGold Ashanti chairman Sipho Pityana has been most vocal, founding the SaveSA campaign to directly lobby for Zuma to resign. On Friday at Church Square he described it as a “fight for the sovereignty of the nation.” He has already directly criticised the new finance minister, Malusi Gigaba, saying the crisis in state-owned enterprises begun under his watch.

Shell South Africa chairman Bonang Mohale, who is also deputy chairman of BLSA, has been more restrained but still criticised the decision for unsettling the markets, asking “why in God’s name would we break something that is just beginning to work” the day before the finance minister was fired. His platform, though, tends to be BLSA rather than Shell. 

The fears over the effect on company brands might well be overdone. In my discussions with institutional fund managers, they are increasingly enthusiastic about more CEO activism. Their portfolios depend on financial stability and long term economic growth, both of which are threatened by the poor political environment. Company leaders should be worried about the same thing. Most of our customers are also very worried. Appearing to take a stand, to speak out, and taking actions like allowing employees time off to join protests, could be rewarded with customer and shareholder loyalty.